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Olga Kozachenko/Unsplash
LISTICLE/05/31/2024
09

innovative textile trends from the Material Lab

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Eco-design is the key to sustainability and circularity in the sports and outdoor industry. In the Material Lab at OutDoor by ISPO, we present numerous bio-based materials made from waste and natural resources. Let yourself be inspired on our guided tour and discover how you can use these game changers to improve your COâ‚‚ balance and create ecological products.

Eco-design plays an important role in the sustainable transformation of the sports and outdoor industry. And bio-based materials are an important key to lower emissions and circularity. In the Sustainability Hub at OutDoor by ISPO, we will once again be presenting around 20 innovative, high-performance and recyclable source products for your textile designs or packaging in the Material Lab - made from agricultural waste, algae, seagrass, olive pits and much more. The Material Lab shows the entire life cycle and the development of the materials from the raw components through the intermediate stages to the finished product. In the Material Lab Guided Tour, daily from 3 p.m., we will introduce you to the companies, start-ups and pioneers and their products. Be inspired to create a new, COâ‚‚-low eco-design!

01

Spinnova

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Spinnova

A cellulose-based textile fiber made from wood shavings that mimics how spiders weave silk for their webs. Spinnova fibers are soft to the touch, breathable and feel similar to cotton. And they biodegrade within a few months in nature or in the sea.

02

Kuori

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Kuori

Novel bio-based, biodegradable and elastic materials made from waste products from the food industry - such as olive pits, banana or walnut shells. The granulate can be used to make shoes, camping equipment, tools or toys, for example.

03

Revoltech

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Revoltech

Hemp is one of the oldest crops in the world. The fibers are malleable, abrasion-resistant and can be processed into a variety of textures and looks - including a leather substitute, the production of which only emits 0.3 % of CO2-emissions that occur during conventional leather production.

04

Climafiber

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Climafibre

Sunflowers are part of regenerative agriculture - and are now also a raw material for textile fibers, natural dyes and water-repellent coatings. The fibers come from the stalks of the flower, the protective coating from a by-product of the sunflower oil industry.

05

Re-Root-Tex

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Re-Root-Tex

The innovation uses waste from pineapple cultivation that is left over after the pineapple fruit has been harvested. It is processed directly on site in Bangladesh, which not only reduces COâ‚‚ is saved, but more than 100 jobs have also been created.

06

OurCarbon

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OurCarbon

In a pyrolysis process, organic waste is converted into a COâ‚‚-neutral raw material and a black pigment that can be used to dye textiles or bioplastics.

07

Ohoskin

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Ohoskin

Alternative luxury leather made from orange and cactus waste from the food and cosmetics industry in Sicily. The raw materials are transformed into a liquid biopolymer that can then be applied as a coating to a textile substrate.

08

Beyond Flares - Ilaria Quinte

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Beyond Flares

A textile base or color pigment made from microalgae. It acts on the skin as an anti-oxidant and has anti-inflammatory properties, so it relieves symptoms such as itching and shields the skin from external bacteria.

Material Futures Masters at Central Saint Martins, University of Arts London

09

Cuemài - Alonso Hernandez

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Cuemài

A textile base or color pigment that is made from the algave residues that are left over from tequilla production. The pigment is 100% bio-based and enables sustainable coloring for various industries and dyeing techniques.

Material Futures Masters at Central Saint Martins, University of Arts London.